Virginia Stroud Children's Books



Virginia Stroud

Children's Books

"The earliest Indian paintings were pictographs, picked into cave walls. When the settlers arrived, paintings were done on hides, flour sacks and covered wagon cloth. In the nineteenth century, paintings were done on ledger books for which goods were traded. All of the art told a story in pictures because there was no written language." -Virginia Stroud

The Path of Quiet Elk

The Path of Quiet Elk

The Path of the Quiet Elk: A Native American Alphabet Book

A lyrical alphabet book, drawn from Native American teachings, which tells of 26 different ways to remember our interconnectedness with everything on earth. The Path of the Quiet Elk is not a place, but a way of learning to look at life. Each letter from A to Z is illustrated with a nature scene painted by reknown Cherokee artist Virginia Stroud. FULL COLOR

The Story of the Milky Way

The Story of the Milky Way

The Story of the Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale

John Bruchac, Gayle Ross, Virginia Stroud (Illustrator)

In a traditional Cherokee creation story, an elderly couple discovers that a giant dog has stolen some of their cornmeal. The villagers drove the dog into the night sky, leaving a band of stars in its wake, creating the Milky Way. Colorful paintings by Virginia Stroud illustrate a lyrical text by two reknown Native American storytellers. FULL COLOR

A Walk to the Great Mystery

A Walk to the Great Mystery

A Walk to the Great Mystery

Virginia Stroud

When Grandma Ann, a medicine woman, takes two young children for a walk in the woods, she promises to help them find the Great Mystery. Just what--and where--could it be? As she shows the children the flora and fauna around them, and they begin to see things through her eyes, the Great Mystery is revealed to them. Beautiful full color acrylic and gouache illustations.

Doesn't Fall Off His Horse

Doesn't Fall Off His Horse

Doesn't Fall Off His Horse

Virginia A. Stroud

In her debut picture book, widely collected Native American artist Virginia Stroud transports readers to the Oklahoma Territory of the 1890s with the breathtaking, and true story of how a Kiowa boy earned his warrior name, as it was related to her by her great-grandfather. FULL COLOR